Realized and Prospective Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances

Publication Type

Report

Date Published

06/2002

LBNL Report Number

LBNL-49504

Abstract

This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2001 period or will take effect by the end of 2007. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions in 2020 by 8-9% compared to the levels expected without any standards. They will save a cumulative total of 25-30 quads by the year 2015, and 60 quads by 2030. The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to nearly $80 billion by 2015, and grows to $130 billion by 2030. The overall benefit/cost ratio of cumulative consumer impacts in the 1987-2050 period is 2.75:1. The cumulative cost of DOE's program to establish and implement the standards is in the range of $200-250 million.

Year of Publication

2002

Institution

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Pagination

43

City

Berkeley